Menu
Home Page

Relationships and Health Education Virtual Meeting

Dear Parents and Carers,

 

Re: Relationships and Health Education (RHE)

 

Relationships and Health Education (RHE) is an important part of our school commitment to provide pupils with the knowledge and skills to keep themselves safe, make healthy choices, develop respect for themselves and others, and form positive and healthy relationships. It also fits with our school aims of being respectful, mindful and having a positive attitude. You can learn more about RHE provision in school by reading our RHE policy.

 

The government guidance for Relationships and Health Education (2019) outlines statutory learning outcomes for all primary-aged pupils from the beginning of the Summer term, 2021. In addition, as recommended by the Department for Education, we also teach non-statutory elements of sex education in an age-appropriate manner in Year 6.  To deliver our curriculum, we use the Discovery Education Health and Relationships Programme to support us in meeting these outcomes through dedicated lesson time, in addition to cross-curricular learning through assemblies and the teaching of related subjects, e.g. Science. The programme lessons progress from Year 1 to Year 6 with activities and videos to make learning engaging and enjoyable for our pupils, as well as developing their learning and understanding in an age-appropriate way.

 

In Year 1 pupils cover the following content across the year:

Healthy and happy friendships

Forming friendships and how kind or unkind behaviours impact other people.

Similarities and differences

Similarities and differences between people and how to respect and celebrate these.

Caring and responsibility

Identifying who our special people are and how they keep us safe.

Families and committed relationships

What a family is (including difference and diversity between families), and why families are important and special.

Healthy bodies, healthy minds

Our bodies and the amazing things they can do. Learning the correct names for different body parts.

Coping with change

Growing from young to old and how we have changed since we were born.

In Year 2 pupils cover the following content across the year:

Healthy and happy friendships

Understanding what makes a happy friendship. Understanding personal boundaries and safe/unsafe situations.

Similarities and differences

Exploring different strengths and abilities. Understanding and challenging stereotypes.

Caring and responsibility

The different communities and groups we belong to and how we help and support one another through these.

Families and committed relationships

The different types of family members and how families vary.

Healthy bodies, healthy minds

Ways to stay healthy, including safe and unsafe use of household products and medicines.

Coping with change

Exploring how our bodies and needs change as we grow older. Aspirations and goal setting.

 

In Year 3 pupils cover the following content across the year:

Healthy and happy friendships

Being a good friend and respecting personal space. Strategies for resilience.

Similarities and differences

Respecting and valuing differences. Shared values of communities.

Caring and responsibility

Our responsibilities and ways we can care and show respect for others.

Families and committed relationships

Exploring the importance of commitment in relationships and how families can change and alter over time, including through separation and loss.

Healthy bodies, healthy minds

Maintaining physical and mental wellbeing through healthy eating, sleep and keeping clean.

Coping with change

Coping with feelings around the changes in our lives.

 

In Year 4 pupils cover the following content across the year:

Healthy and happy friendships

Solving friendship difficulties. How to act if someone invades your privacy or personal boundaries.

Similarities and differences

Identity and diversity. Seeing different perspectives and not making judgements based on appearance.

Caring and responsibility

Rights and responsibilities within families and wider society, including the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Families and committed relationships

The range of relationships we experience in our everyday lives. How to identify each relationship and understand the differences between the types of relationships we encounter.

Healthy bodies, healthy minds

Influences on our health and wellbeing, including friends, family and media, and awareness of how these can affect personal choices.

Coping with change

How our bodies change as we enter puberty, including hygiene and menstruation.

 

 

 

 

In Year 5 pupils cover the following content across the year:

Healthy and happy friendships

Identity and peer pressure in real life and online. Positive emotional health and wellbeing.

Similarities and differences

Celebrating strengths, setting goals and keeping ourselves safe online.

Caring and responsibility

How our care needs change and the effects of loneliness and isolation. Ways in which we can show care in the community. 

Families and committed relationships

The characteristics of healthy, positive and committed relationships, and how these develop as people grow older.

Healthy bodies, healthy minds

Our unique bodies and self-acceptance – valuing our bodies and minds; lifestyle habits (including alcohol, tobacco and drugs) and their effects on wellbeing.

Coping with change

How puberty changes can affect our emotions and feelings and ways to manage this; questions about puberty and change, including periods and wet dreams.

 

In Year 6 pupils cover the following content across the year:

Healthy and happy friendships

How relationships evolve as we grow, and how to cope with a wider range of emotions.

Similarities and differences

Identity and behaviour online and offline. Reflecting on how people feel when they don’t ‘fit in’.

Caring and responsibility

How we can take more responsibility for self-care and who cares for us as we grow older, including at secondary school.

Families and committed relationships

Sex education: adult relationships and human reproduction, including different ways to start a family. 

Healthy bodies, healthy minds

Being the best me: ongoing self-care of bodies and minds, including ways to prevent and manage mental ill-health.

Coping with change

Transitions (including to secondary school) and ways to manage the increasing responsibilities and emotional effects of life changes.

 

In line with our RHE policy, teachers will answer any questions from pupils in an age-appropriate and factual way, without personal bias or judgement. All teachers will have boxes in their classrooms where pupils can post questions anonymously if they wish.

 

Questions will be answered in one of the following ways:

  • by providing an answer to the whole class
  • by giving an individual answer to a pupil
  • or, on rare occasions, by contacting parents if we feel the question would be better handled in the home setting

 

Any questions that give rise to concerns of a safeguarding nature will be handled in line with our published Safeguarding Policy.

We welcome you contacting us if you have any questions or comments about the school’s approach to this important, statutory area of learning. We will be holding a virtual meeting to discuss the new Relationships and Health Education Curriculum. This will be your opportunity to hear what is going to be taught in the classroom and to ask questions.

 

The meeting will be held via Zoom on Tuesday 2nd March 2021.  There will be one meeting at 9am and another at 3pm. If you would like to attend, please either telephone or email the school so that we can send you the zoom link.

 

Relationship and Health Education is statutory and the only part that parents have the right to withdraw children from is the sex education lessons in Year 6. These lessons are the ones that come under the ‘Families and Committed Relationships’ topic. We would welcome the opportunity to talk you through the content of these lessons. If you would like to exercise the right to excuse your child from these lessons, you must advise the school office in writing. Pupils who are excused from lessons will be given meaningful work to do during this time.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Ms. Emma Murray,

Head Teacher

Top